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Nutritional Status, Dietary Intake, Quality of Life and Dysphagia in Women With Fibromyalgia.

Nursing Research 2024 Februrary 7
BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is an idiopathic chronic disease characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, hyperalgesia, and allodynia that has been recently associated with risk of dysphagia.

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to analyze the association between nutritional status, micro- and macronutrient intake and quality of life (QoL) in a cohort of women with FMS and risk of dysphagia compared to women with FMS without risk of dysphagia.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 46 women with FMS. Risk of dysphagia was assessed by the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT) and the Volume-Viscosity Test (V-VST). The Food Frequency Questionnaire and the Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire were used to assess dietary intake and QoL, respectively.

RESULTS: Thirty women with FMS were at risk for dysphagia (65.21%) assessed by the EAT-10. Based on the V-VST, the frequency of risk of dysphagia was 63.04%. Significant differences in body mass index (BMI) were found between women at risk for dysphagia and those without risk. Women at risk for dysphagia had significantly lower overall QoL scores than those women without risk. No significant differences were found for dietary intake and dysphagia risk.

DISCUSSION: Women with FMS at risk for dysphagia have significantly lower BMI values and worse QoL than women without dysphagia risk, supporting the importance of assessing dysphagia in clinical practice in persons with FMS.

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