Case Reports
Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Well-differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Sarcomatous Differentiation in Patient With a History of Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma.

Human papillomavirus-independent vulvar squamous cell carcinoma has a peak incidence in about the eighth decade of life. A variable portion of the vulvar squamous cell carcinoma are human papillomavirus-independent comprising 20% to 80% of all cases. Verrucous carcinoma (VC) is part of the spectrum of human papillomavirus-independent carcinomas and its combination with well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with sarcomatous differentiation is an extremely unusual neoplasm. The available literature on VC is currently limited to case reports and small single-institution studies. Here, we present a case concerning an 81-year-old woman with a history of chronic itching, swelling, and lichen sclerosis with variable-sized multiple white-pink plaques of the vulva. The pathologic diagnosis of VC was made. The patient later on developed multiple lesions of biopsy proved VC and most recent biopsy shows well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with abrupt sarcomatous differentiation. A review of the literature shows the rarity of this lesion of the female genital tract. Clinicians and patients should be aware of the aggressive behavior of cancers and adjust their surgical management together with the follow-up strategy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a VC and well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with abrupt sarcomatous differentiation occurring in the vulva.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app