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Gut microbiota modulation and effects of a diet enriched in apple pomace on inflammation in a DSS-induced colitis mouse model.

Food & Function 2024 Februrary 8
Certain types of soluble dietary fibre, such as pectin and pectic oligosaccharides from different sources, have demonstrated protective effects against inflammation in DSS-induced colitis mouse models. In this work, we have evaluated the impact of a diet enriched in apple pomace (AP-diet), an agricultural by-product with a significant content of pectin and that previously demonstrated prebiotic properties in human fecal batch fermentation models, on the gut microbiota composition, intestinal damage and inflammation markers in a DSS-induced colitis model. We found that the apple pomace enriched diet (AP-diet), providing a significant amount of pectin with demonstrated prebiotic properties, was associated with a slower increase in the disease activity index, translating into better clinical symptomatology of the animals. Histological damage scoring confirmed less severe damage in those animals receiving an AP-diet before and during the DSS administration period. Some serum inflammatory markers, such as TNFα, also demonstrated lower levels in the group receiving the AP-diet, compared to the control diet. AP-diet administration is also associated with the modulation of key taxa in the colonic microbiota of animals, such as some Lachnospiraceae genera and Ruminococcus species, including commensal short chain fatty acid producers that could play a role in attenuating inflammation at the intestinal level.

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