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Managing Monkeypox Virus Infections: A Contemporary Review.

Monkeypox is an infectious and contagious zoonotic disease caused by the Orthopoxvirus species and was first identified in Africa. Recently, this infectious disease has spread widely in many parts of the world. Fever, fatigue, headache, and rash are common symptoms of monkeypox. The presence of lymphadenopathy is another prominent and key symptom of monkeypox, which distinguishes this disease from other diseases and is useful for diagnosing the disease. This disease is transmitted to humans through contact with or eating infected animals as well as objects infected with the virus. One of the ways to diagnose this disease is through PCR testing of lesions and secretions. To prevent the disease, vaccines such as JYNNEOS and ACAM2000 are available, but they are not accessible to all people in the world, and their effectiveness and safety need further investigation. However, preventive measures such as avoiding contact with people infected with the virus and using appropriate personal protective equipment are mandatory. The disease therapy is based on medicines such as brincidofovir, cidofovir, and Vaccinia Immune Globulin Intravenous. The injectable format of tecovirimat was approved recently, in May 2022. Considering the importance of clinical care in this disease, awareness about the side effects of medicines, nutrition, care for conjunctivitis, skin rash, washing and bathing at home, and so on can be useful in controlling and managing the disease.

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