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The Triglycerides and Glucose Index Is an Independent Risk Factor for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients with COVID-19.

Introduction: Although it has been observed that the triglycerides and glucose (TyG) index, a biomarker of insulin resistance, is associated with severity and morbidity by COVID-19, evidence is still scarce. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether the TyG index is associated with both the degree of severity and mortality by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients with COVID-19. Methods: Men and women aged 20 years or more with diagnosis of COVID-19 were included in a case-control study. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy, cancer, autoimmune diseases, autoimmune treatment, and incomplete data. Patients with severe COVID-19 ARDS were allocated into the case group, and those with mild or moderate COVID-19 ARDS in the control group. COVID-19 was defined by a positive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction test for SARS-CoV-2, and ARDS was defined according to the Berlin criteria. Results: A total of 206 patients were included and allocated into the case ( n  = 103) and control ( n  = 103) groups. The logistic regression analysis adjusted by age, sex, and body mass index showed that the TyG index is significantly associated with moderate [odds ratio (OR) = 6.0; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-30.6] and severe (OR = 9.5; 95% CI: 2.4-37.5) COVID-19 ARDS, and death (OR = 10.1; 95% CI: 2.2-46.5). Conclusion: The results of our study show a significant and independent association of the TyG index with ARDS and mortality in patients with COVID-19.

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