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Blood pressure responsiveness to resistance training in the hypertensive older adult: a randomized controlled study.

Different lifestyle changes have been employed to improve clinical hypertension. However, there is scarce evidence on the blood pressure responsiveness to resistance training (RT) in hypertensive older adults. Consequently, little is known about some participants clinically reducing blood pressure and others not. Thus, we investigate the effects and responsiveness of RT on blood pressure in hypertensive older adults. We secondarily evaluated the biochemical risk factors for cardiovascular disease and functional performance. Older participants with hypertension were randomly assigned into RT (n = 27) and control group (n = 25). Blood pressure, functional performance (timed up and go, handgrip strength, biceps curl and sit-to-stand), fasting glucose, and lipid profiles were evaluated preintervention and postintervention. The statistic was performed in a single-blind manner, the statistician did not know who was the control and RT. RT was effective in reducing systolic blood pressure (SBP) (pre 135.7 ± 14.7; post 124.7 ± 11.0; P  < 0.001) and the responses to RT stimuli varied noticeably between hypertensive older adults after 12 weeks. For example, 13 and 1 responders displayed a minimal clinical important difference for SBP attenuation (10.9 mmHg) in the RT and control groups, respectively. RT improved the functional performance of older people with hypertension, while no differences were found in biochemical parameters (triglycerides, HDL, LDL, fasting glucose) after 12 weeks. In conclusion, responses to RT stimuli varied noticeably between hypertensive individuals and RT was effective in reducing SBP.

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