Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Sex differences in the effects of repeated ketamine infusions on bone markers in patients with unipolar and bipolar depression.

BACKGROUND: Patients with depression, especially women, are associated with low bone mineral density (BMD). Traditional antidepressants are associated with negative effects on BMD. Few studies have examined the effect of ketamine on BMD, and it remains unclear whether there are sex differences in the effects of ketamine on BMD in patients with depression.

METHODS: A total of 102 patients with unipolar and bipolar depression were administered six infusions of intravenous ketamine over a 12-day period. Plasma levels of eight bone markers were examined at baseline, 24 h after the sixth infusion and again 2 weeks (Days 13 and 26).

RESULTS: Linear mixed models showed all bone markers had significant time main effect (all p < 0.05). Compared with baseline, the whole sample showed increased levels of leptin and osteoprotegerin at Days 13 and 26, as well as Dickkopf-related protein 1 at Day 13, and decreased levels of osteocalcin, sclerostin, osteopontin, parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor 23 at Days 13 and 26 (all p < 0.05). Females had a higher level of leptin at Days 13 and 26, and lower levels of osteocalcin and sclerostin at Day 13 than males (all p < 0.05). Increases of leptin were associated with depressive symptom improvements at Day 13 and Day 26 in females (both p < 0.05). In males, higher baseline osteocalcin levels were associated with greater depressive symptom improvement at Day 26 (β = 0.414, p = 0.009).

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that repeated ketamine infusions may be associated with modulation of bone markers in patients with depression and present sex differences. Baseline osteocalcin level may be served as a predictor for the antidepressant effects of ketamine in males. Trial registration Data were derived from an open label clinical trial, which was registered at Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR-OOC-17012239). Registered 26 May 2017. https://www.chictr.org.cn.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app