Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Human leukocyte antigen alloimmunization prevention mechanisms in blood transfusion.

In many fields of clinical medicine and blood transfusion, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is crucial. Alloimmunization happens as a result of an immune response to foreign antigens encountered during blood transfusion. This gives rise to alloantibodies against red blood cells (RBCs), HLA, or human platelet antigen (HPA). HLA alloimmunization following allogeneic transfusion was shown to be a result of contaminating white blood cells (WBCs) present in the product. It is a common complication of transfusion therapy that leads to difficulties in clinical intolerance and refractoriness to platelet transfusion during patient management. Single-donor platelets, prophylactic HLA matching, leukoreduction, and irradiation of cellular blood products are some of the mechanisms to prevent HLA alloimmunization during a blood transfusion. Now, the best approach to reduce the occurrence of primary HLA alloimmunization is the removal of WBCs from the blood by filtration.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app