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Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to minor blood group alloimmunization in a mother of sickle cell disease with multiple alloantibodies.

Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is due to maternal IgG antibodies that transport through the placenta and destroy neonatal red cells. A mismatch of antigens between mother and fetus causes isoimmunization resulting in mild anemia, which may progress to fetal hydrops in the intrauterine period and severe hyperbilirubinemia to kernicterus in neonates. The isoimmunization is mainly caused by Rh-D and ABO antibodies. In this case report, we found neonatal hyperbilirubinemia due to the presence of anti-c alloantibody previously developed in a sickle cell disease (SCD) pregnant female. It is an unusual case of fetal hyperbilirubinemia due to minor blood group alloimmunization in a SCD needing exchange transfusion. Multi-transfused patients should be counseled regarding the need to perform antibody screening frequently before pregnancy for better treatment of both mother and child.

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