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Beyond the Usual Suspects: Primary Premaxilla Sarcoidosis.

INTRODUCTION: Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic systemic granulomatous disorder that can affect multiple organs, including rare extrapulmonary sites like the premaxilla. This case report presents a rare occurrence of premaxillary sarcoidosis, a condition scarcely reported in medical literature.

CASE REPORT: The patient, a 62-year-old male, presented with a progressively enlarging painless swelling on the right cheek over a three-year period. Despite multiple Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) examinations yielding no conclusive diagnosis, a contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan revealed an ill-defined lesion in the premaxillary soft tissue. Biopsy and subsequent excision procedures confirmed the presence of non-caseating granulomas with asteroid bodies, indicative of sarcoidosis. With no systemic involvement and complete excision of the disease, further treatment was not necessary.

CONCLUSION: This case highlights the challenges in diagnosing premaxillary (Extrapulmonary Sarcoidosis) sarcoidosis due to its rarity and resemblance to other dental and maxillofacial conditions and granulomatous lesions. Accurate diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, multidisciplinary approach, involving clinical assessment, histopathological analysis, and imaging modalities. By deepening our understanding of these uncommon presentations, this report aims to enhance clinical awareness and contribute to improved patient outcomes.

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