JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Hematological Neoplasms with Eosinophilia.

Cancers 2024 January 13
Eosinophils in peripheral blood account for 0.3-5% of leukocytes, which is equivalent to 0.05-0.5 × 109 /L. A count above 0.5 × 109 /L is considered to indicate eosinophilia, while a count equal to or above 1.5 × 109 /L is defined as hypereosinophilia. In bone marrow aspirate, eosinophilia is considered when eosinophils make up more than 6% of the total nuclear cells. In daily clinical practice, the most common causes of reactive eosinophilia are non-hematologic, whether they are non-neoplastic (allergic diseases, drugs, infections, or immunological diseases) or neoplastic (solid tumors). Eosinophilia that is associated with a hematological malignancy may be reactive or secondary to the production of eosinophilopoietic cytokines, and this is mainly seen in lymphoid neoplasms (Hodgkin lymphoma, mature T-cell neoplasms, lymphocytic variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome, and B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma). Eosinophilia that is associated with a hematological malignancy may also be neoplastic or primary, derived from the malignant clone, usually in myeloid neoplasms or with its origin in stem cells (myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and tyrosine kinase gene fusions, acute myeloid leukemia with core binding factor translocations, mastocytosis, myeloproliferative neoplasms, myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, and myelodysplastic neoplasms). There are no concrete data in standardized cytological and cytometric procedures that could predict whether eosinophilia is reactive or clonal. The verification is usually indirect, based on the categorization of the accompanying hematologic malignancy. This review focuses on the broad differential diagnosis of hematological malignancies with eosinophilia.

Full text links

We have located open access text paper links.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app