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Analysis of clinical characteristics and risk factors for death due to severe influenza in children.

OBJECTIVE: The study analyzed the clinical features of children who had severe influenza and discussed on the risk factors associated with death in this population.

METHODS: A total of 167 children with severe influenza admitted to the intensive care unit of our hospital from January 2018 to August 2023 were selected and divided into the death group (27 cases) and the survival group (140 cases). Demographic characteristics and clinical data were collected and compared between the two groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the risk factors for death in children with severe influenza.

RESULTS: The male-to-female ratio of the 167 children with severe influenza was 2.21:1, the median age was 3 years, and influenza A accounted for 70.66%. The CD4+ T cells percentage and CD4/CD8 were lower in the death group; the percentage of comorbid underlying diseases, mechanical ventilation, other systemic involvement, comorbid associated encephalopathy or encephalitis, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), lactate dehydrogenase, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and interleukin 6 were higher in the death group. The mechanical ventilation, associated encephalopathy or encephalitis, RDW, APTT, and CD4/CD8 were the independent risk factors for death.

CONCLUSION: Mechanical ventilation, comorbid encephalopathy or encephalitis, increased RDW, prolonged APTT, and decreased CD4/CD8 are independent risk factors for death in children with severe influenza.

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