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Sacrococcygeal chordoma. A clinicoradiological study of 60 patients.

Sixty patients with sacrococcygeal chordoma, who were seen at this center between 1946 and 1985, were studied with particular attention to the radiographic findings. This study was undertaken because of the large number of these cases and comparison was made between the plain films available in 39 patients and the computed tomography CT studies in 22. Bone destruction was found in 78% on plain films but in 90% on CT. A soft tissue mass was identified in plain films in 60% but in 90% on CT. Calcific debris was found in plain films in 44% but in 87% on CT. Mostly the debris consisted of coarse irregular fragments and probably represented sequestrated necrotic bone. Myelography was performed in only 15 patients. Angiography was studied in 10 cases. Of the 60 patients 88% underwent surgical resection. The tumor recurred in 80% and in only 20% was there no evidence of recurrence. Distant metastases occurred in 24% of patients. Fifty percent survived 5 years; 28% survived 10 years; mean survival 7.5 years.

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