Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Comprehensive assessment of the combined impact of dyslipidemia and inflammation on chronic kidney disease development: A prospective cohort study.

BACKGROUND: There remains a limited comprehensive understanding of how dyslipidemia and chronic inflammation collectively contribute to the development of CKD.

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify clusters of individuals with five variables, including lipid profiles and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and to assess whether the clusters were associated with incident CKD risk.

METHODS: We used the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study-Ansan and Ansung data. K-means clustering analysis was performed to identify distinct clusters based on total cholesterol, triglyceride, non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-C, HDL-C, and CRP levels. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between incident CKD risk and the different clusters.

RESULTS: During the mean 10-year follow-up period, CKD developed in 1,645 participants (690 men and 955 women) among a total of 8,053 participants with a mean age of 51.8 years. Four distinct clusters were identified: C1, low cholesterol group (LC); C2, high HDL-C group (HC); C3, insulin resistance and inflammation group (IIC); and C4, dyslipidemia and inflammation group (DIC). Cluster 4 had a significantly higher risk of incident CKD compared to clusters 2 (HR 1.455 [95% CI 1.234-1.715]; p < 0.001) and cluster 1 (HR 1.264 [95% CI 1.067-1.498]; p = 0.007) after adjusting for confounders. Cluster 3 had a significantly higher risk of incident CKD compared to cluster 2 and 1.

CONCLUSION: Clusters 4 and 3 had higher risk of incident CKD compared to clusters 2 and 1. The combination of dyslipidemia with inflammation or insulin resistance with inflammation appears to be pivotal in the development of incident CKD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app