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Better chance of survival is associated with higher neutrophil CD16 expression in patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections.

AIM: The ability of neutrophil CD16 (nCD16) expression to predict outcome in complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs) has not yet been studied; therefore we aimed to evaluate its potential prognostic value in such patients.

METHODS: Between November 2018 and August 2021 a single-center prospective study was performed in the Department of Surgical Diseases at a University Hospital Stara Zagora. A flow cytometry was used to measure the levels of nCD16 before surgery and on the 3rd postoperative day (POD) in 62 patients with cIAIs.

RESULTS: We observed a mortality rate of 14.5% during hospitalization. Survivors had significantly higher perioperative expression of nCD16 than non-survivors (P = 0.02 preoperatively and P = 0.006 postoperatively). As predictor of favorable outcome we found a good predictive performance of preoperative nCD16 (AUROC = 0.745) and a very good predictive performance of postoperative levels (AUROC = 0.846). An optimal preoperative threshold nCD16 = 34.75 MFI permitted prediction of survival with sensitivity and specificity of 66.7% and 77.8%, respectively. A better sensitivity of 72.5% and specificity of 85.7% were observed for threshold = 54.8 MFI on the 3rd POD.

CONCLUSION: Perioperative neutrophil CD16 expression shows a great potential as a predictor of favorable outcome in patients with cIAIs.

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