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Penetrating Neck Injury Involving Wooden Foreign Bodies: Case Report.

Although rare, penetrating neck injuries can have grave consequences, and are associated with high mortality rates. Individuals with cervical injuries due to wooden foreign bodies are at an increased risk of developing infectious complications. In this case, a male patient aged 27 years presented with a cervical injury indicative of a penetrating wound caused by a wooden foreign body. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed no signs of intracranial hemorrhage or fracture. Additionally, cervical CT scan showed no evidence of cervical corpus or longus colli muscle lesions. The medical team suggested a cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination; however, the patient's family opted out. Subsequently, the patient underwent wound debridement, which involved the extraction of a fragment of impaling wood. Two days after the procedure, the patient developed a fever and weakness of the shoulder and arm on the ipsilateral side. Following the process of re-education, the family provided consent for MRI examination. A subsequent surgical procedure was performed on the patient based on the MRI findings and clinical presentation. Residual wooden fragments were effectively extracted, resulting in positive progression of the patient's condition.

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