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Normalization of the Suppression Head Impulse Test (SHIMP) and its correlation with the Head Impulse Test (HIMP) in healthy adults.

OBJECTIVE: In our study, it was aimed to compare vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain and saccade parameters in HIMP and SHIMP tests between gender, right and left ears, and age groups in healthy adults and to examine the correlation between the tests regarding these parameters.

METHODS: The study included a total of 100 healthy participants aged 18-65 and without complaints of hearing loss, dizziness, lightheadedness, and/or imbalance. Participants underwent HIMP and SHIMP tests, respectively.

RESULTS: No significant difference was found in HIMP and SHIMP VOR gain values according to gender and age groups. SHIMP duration was significantly longer in women. VOR gain values were lower in the right ear. HIMP amplitude values were higher and SHIMP amplitude values were lower with increasing age. In older age groups, SHIMP peak velocity and duration values were significantly decreased, while HIMP duration value increased and latency value was longer. In the 1st saccade, a significant difference was obtained between HIMP and SHIMP tests for all saccade parameters. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the VOR gain values of HIMP and SHIMP tests.

CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that VOR gain and saccade parameters obtained in different age groups will be important in determining clinical outcomes in vestibular pathologies.

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