Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Differentiation Potential of Hypodifferentiated Subsets of Nephrogenic Rests and Its Relationship to Prognosis in Wilms Tumor.

Background Wilms tumor (WT) is highly curable, although anaplastic histology or relapse imparts a worse prognosis. Nephrogenic rests (NR) associated with a high risk of developing WT are abnormally retained embryonic kidney precursor cells. Methods After pseudo-time analysis using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) data, we generated and validated a WT differentiation-related gene (WTDRG) signature to predict overall survival (OS) in children with a poor OS. Results A differentiation trajectory from NR to WT was identified and showed that hypodifferentiated subsets of NR could differentiate into WT. Classification of WT children with anaplastic histology or relapse based on the expression patterns of WTDRGs suggested that patients with relatively high levels of hypodifferentiated NR presented a poorer prognosis. A WTDRG-based risk model and a clinically applicable nomogram was developed. Conclusions These findings may inform oncogenesis of WT and interventions directed toward poor prognosis in WT children of anaplastic histology or relapse.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app