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A comparative study of surgical outcomes for secondary spontaneous pneumothorax and the postoperative survival prognostic factor: interstitial vs. non-interstitial pneumonia.

PURPOSE: To investigate the surgical outcomes and postoperative survival prognostic factors of intractable secondary spontaneous pneumothorax.

METHODS: A total of 95 patients who underwent thoracoscopic surgery for intractable secondary spontaneous pneumothorax between April 2010 and March 2020 were included in this study. These patients were classified into interstitial pneumonia and non-interstitial pneumonia groups, and a comparative study was performed on surgical outcomes and postoperative survival prognostic factors.

RESULTS: There was no difference in the 1-year overall survival rate between the two groups. However, the 3-year overall survival rate was significantly lower in the interstitial pneumonia group than in the non-interstitial pneumonia group. The differences in short-term surgical outcomes (persistent air leakage, postoperative complications, etc.) were not significant between the two groups. Univariate analysis revealed that the drainage period, the development of postoperative complications, and recurrence were significant independent postoperative survival prognostic factors for all cases. Postoperative complications were the only associated postoperative survival prognostic factor for interstitial pneumonia pneumothorax in the multivariate analysis.

CONCLUSION: The development of postoperative complications can cause poor postoperative survival prognosis of intractable secondary spontaneous pneumothorax due to interstitial pneumonia.

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