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Impact of prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation on outcomes in heart transplantation with higher risk donor heart.

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on outcomes in heart transplantation with higher risk donor hearts (HRDHs).

METHODS: Patients transplanted in our hospital between May 2006 and December 2019 were divided into 2 groups, HRDH recipients and non HRDH recipients. HRDH was defined as meeting at least one of the following criteria: (1) donor left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 50%, (2) donor-recipient predicted heart mass ratio < 0.8 or > 1.2, (3) donor age ≥ 55 years, (4) ischemic time > 4 h and (5) catecholamine index > 20. Recipients of HRDHs were divided into 3 groups according to the time of CPR (Group1: non-CPR, Group 2: less than 30 min-CPR, and Group 3: longer than 30 min CPR).

RESULTS: A total of 125 recipients were enrolled in this study, composing of HRDH recipients (n = 97, 78%) and non HRDH recipients (n = 28, 22%). Overall survival and the rate of freedom from cardiac events at 10 years after heart transplantation were comparable between two groups. Of 97 HRDH recipients, 54 (56%) without CPR, 22 (23%) with CPR < 30 min, and 21 (22%) with CPR ≥ 30 min were identified. One-year survival rates were not significantly different among three groups. The 1-year rate of freedom from cardiac events was not also statistically different, excluding the patients with coronary artery disease found in early postoperative period, which was thought to be donor-transmitted disease. Multivariate logistics regression for cardiac events identified that the CPR duration was not a risk factor even in HRDH-recipients.

CONCLUSION: The CPR duration did not affect the outcomes after heart transplantation in HRDH recipients.

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