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Risk Factors of Postoperative Infection in Newborns with Congenital Heart Disease.

Heart Surgery Forum 2023 December 27
AIMS: This study aims to explore the risk factors of postoperative infection in newborns with congenital heart disease.

METHODS: From January 2019 to January 2023, 78 neonates with congenital heart disease who were diagnosed and treated in our hospital with postoperative infection as well as an age- and sex-matched non-infected group (n = 78) were enrolled. After collecting the data and clinical information of 156 children, we compared the differences in the days of catheter indwelling, days of mechanical ventilation, times of blood transfusion, days of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and survival status between postoperative infection and non-infection groups. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the risk factors of postoperative infection in newborns with congenital heart disease.

RESULTS: Age (11 ± 4 vs. 10 ± 5 days) and sex (56.4% vs. 52.6%) were comparable between the infection and non-infection groups. Children in the infection group had lower birth weight, higher proportion of cesarean section, lower oxygen saturation levels, and higher risk adjustment in congenital heart surgery (RACHS-1) scores than those in the non-infection group. In terms of postoperative indicators, neonates in the infection group had longer catheter indwelling time, mechanical ventilation time, ICU hospitalization days, and more blood transfusion times than those in the non-infection group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that oxygen saturation <85% (OR: 6.5; 95% CI: 3.7-15.4), catheter indwelling days >14 days (OR: 3.2; 95% CI: 2.1-10.7), and ICU stay >10 days (OR: 7.1; 95% CI: 3.6-18.5) were independent risk factors for postoperative infection in newborns with congenital heart disease.

CONCLUSION: Low oxygen saturation, prolonged catheterization days, and prolonged ICU stay were independent risk factors for postoperative infection in neonates with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery.

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