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Can Inflammation Indices Preoperatively Predict Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery?

Heart Surgery Forum 2023 December 27
BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease is a condition characterized by atherosclerosis and inflammation in the vessel wall. In patient undergoing surgery, a systemic inflammatory-like condition occurs in the postoperative period through mediators that develop due to acute stress.

METHODS: 581 patients enrolled from the hospital records from 2019 and 2022 retrospectively. Systemic immune inflammation index (SII), systemic inflammation response index (SIRI) and aggregated index of systemic inflammation (AISI) values were calculated from peripheral blood samples taken at hospital admission using the formula SII = platelet (P) × neutrophil (N) / lymphocyte (L), SIRI = N × monocyte (M) / L, AISI = (N × M × P) / L.

RESULTS: The mean age of the 581 patients included in the study was 63.97 ± 8.77 years. 45% of the patients were women. Mean cardio-pulmonary bypass time (CPBT) was 100.31 ± 31.94 and mean cross-clamp time (CCT) was 59.79 ± 24.07. When the correlation of acute kidney injury (AKI) development was analyzed with the variables (P/L ratio, N/L ratio, SII, SIRI, AISI, CCT and CPBT), all variables we tested and age were found to be significantly correlated (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSION: We think that the calculations we tested in our study, together with the understanding of the complexity of the inflammatory system, will constitute an important step in the detection of AKI.

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