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First Safety and Efficacy Data with the Radiohybrid 177 Lu-rhPSMA-10.1 for the Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

We recently published the first dosimetry data, to our knowledge, for the radioligand therapy agent 177 Lu-rhPSMA-10.1, providing an intrapatient comparison with 177 Lu-PSMA-I&T in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Here, we report efficacy and safety findings from these patients. Methods: Four consecutive patients with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive metastatic prostate cancer received up to 6 cycles of 177 Lu-rhPSMA-10.1 (7.4-7.7 GBq per cycle). Efficacy (prostate-specific antigen response according to Prostate Cancer Working Group 3 criteria and the Response Evaluation Criteria in PSMA PET/CT), progression-free survival, and overall survival were evaluated. Adverse events were recorded from the first dose until 16-24 mo after treatment. Results: The patients received a total activity of 29.6-59.4 GBq (4-6 cycles). Prostate-specific antigen was reduced by 100%, 99%, 88%, and 35%. Progression-free survival was not reached for 2 patients at 24 and 18 mo of follow-up and was 15 and 12 mo for the other 2 patients. One patient had a sustained complete response with 2 y of follow up. All patients were alive at the last time point of data collection. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion: 177 Lu-rhPSMA-10.1 demonstrated encouraging preliminary efficacy and was well tolerated. Formal clinical trials are now under way to evaluate its potential prospectively (NCT05413850).

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