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The Effect of Immunoglobulin G on the Humoral Immunity in Patients with Tuberculosis/HIV Coinfection.

Previously, an increase in clinical effectiveness of the antituberculosis treatment (ATT) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in case of additional immunoglobulin G (IgG) administration in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)/HIV coinfection was reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of IgG administration in addition to the standard second-line ATT and ART on the humoral immunity status in patients with MDR-TB/HIV coinfection immune deficiency. The study involved 52 patients living with HIV with MDR-TB coinfection and CD4+ lymphocyte cell count below 50 cells/μCL. Patients in the control group and intervention group received the second-line ATT and ART; in addition, patients in the intervention group received IgG intravenously. The humoral immunity status was evaluated by measurement of IgA, IgE, IgG, and IgM in plasma. The standard ATT and ART resulted in a two-step change in humoral immunity: IgM, IgG, IgA, and IgE levels gradually increased to a maximal level at the 5-month mark and started to gradually decrease after the 8-month mark. Addition of IgG to the standard therapy resulted in a steeper decrease in the immunoglobulin level in serum, especially IgG, compared with standard therapy alone, allowing for an earlier initiation of ART in patients in the intervention group.

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