Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Findings from the KNOW-CKD Study indicate that higher systolic blood pressure time in target range is associated with a lower risk of chronic kidney disease progression.

Time-in-target range (TTR) of systolic blood pressure (SBP) is determined by the proportion of time during which SBP remains within a defined optimal range. TTR has emerged as a useful metric for assessing SBP control over time. However, it is uncertain if SBP-TTR can predict the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here, we investigated the association between SBP-TTR during the first year of enrollment and CKD progression among 1758 participants from the KNOW-CKD (KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease). Baseline median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 51.7 ml/min per 1.73 m2 . Participants were categorized into four SBP-TTR groups (0%, 1-50%, 51-99%, and 100%). The primary outcome was CKD progression defined as 50% or more decline in eGFR from baseline measurement or the initiation of kidney replacement therapy. During the follow-up period (9212 person-years over a median 5.4 years), the composite outcome occurred in 710 participants. In the multivariate cause-specific hazard model, a one-standard deviation increase in SBP-TTR was associated with an 11% lower risk of the composite outcome with hazard ratio, 0.89 (95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.97). Additionally, compared to patients with SBP-TTR 0%, the respective hazard ratios for those with SBP-TTR 1-50%, 51-99%, and 100% were 0.85 (0.68-1.07), 0.76 (0.60-0.96), and 0.72 (0.55-0.94), and the respective corresponding slopes of eGFR decline were -3.17 (-3.66 to -2.69), -3.02 (-3.35 to -2.68), -2.62 (-2.89 to - 2.36), and -2.33 (-2.62 to -2.04) ml/min/1.73 m2 . Thus, higher SBP-TTR was associated with a decreased risk of CKD progression in patients with CKD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app