Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Pressure and Skin: A Review of Disease Entities Driven or Influenced by Mechanical Pressure.

Skin perceives and reacts to external mechanical forces to create resistance against the external environment. Excessive or inappropriate stimuli of pressure may lead to cellular alterations of the skin and the development of both benign and malignant skin disorders. We conducted a comprehensive literature review to delve into the pressure-induced and aggravated skin disorders and their underlying pressure-related mechanisms. Dysregulated mechanical responses of the skin give rise to local inflammation, ischemia, necrosis, proliferation, hyperkeratosis, impaired regeneration, atrophy, or other injurious reactions, resulting in various disease entities. The use of personal devices, activities, occupations, weight bearing, and even unintentional object contact and postures are potential scenarios that account for the development of pressure-related skin disorders. The spectrum of these skin disorders may involve the epidermis (keratinocytes and melanocytes), hair follicles, eccrine glands, nail apparatuses, dermis (fibroblasts, mast cells, and vasculature), subcutis, and fascia. Clarifying the clinical context of each patient and recognizing how pressure at the cellular and tissue levels leads to skin lesions can enhance our comprehension of pressure-related skin disorders to attain better management.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app