Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Prescribing patterns of adjunctive therapy for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus among Australian endocrinologists.

Internal Medicine Journal 2023 December 30
BACKGROUND: Many people living with type 1 diabetes (type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM)) do not meet glycaemic targets. Adjunctive therapies have both risks and metabolic benefits and may have a role in selected patients.

AIM: To review the prescribing patterns of adjunctive therapy for the treatment of T1DM diabetes in Australia.

METHODS: We conducted an online survey of Australian endocrinologists and endocrinology registrars. We surveyed the frequency of, motivations and concerns regarding the prescription of metformin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-IV) inhibitors, sodium-glucose transport protein 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP1RA) in T1DM.

RESULTS: Fifty-two practitioners participated. Most respondents (94%) had prescribed adjuncts for the treatment of T1DM in some form. Weight (89%), large insulin doses (73%), glycaemic variability (52%), high HbA1c (48%) and the presence of cardiovascular disease (48%) were the most common factors determining the use of adjuncts. The most commonly prescribed adjuncts were metformin (94%) and SGLT-2 inhibitors (65%). Respondents who had never prescribed an SGLT-2 inhibitor (n = 18) reported risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (100%), off-label status (39%), lack of evidence (39%), withdrawal of support from the European Medicines Agency (17%) and cost (17%) as factors contributing to their decision. Thirty-one respondents (60%) had prescribed a GLP1RA. Among those who had never prescribed a GLP1RA (n = 21), off-label status (57%), lack of evidence (48%), cost (38%) and expected lack of efficacy (14%) were factors affecting their decision. Only five respondents (10%) had prescribed a DPP-IV inhibitor.

CONCLUSION: Australian endocrinologists commonly prescribe adjuncts to address cardiometabolic concerns in T1DM. DKA risk and off-label status are significant factors contributing to reluctance to prescribe.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app