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Eosinophilic oesophagitis: a common cause of food bolus obstruction.

Internal Medicine Journal 2023 December 28
BACKGROUND: Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EOE) is a known cause of food bolus obstruction (FBO) with rising incidence and prevalence.

AIMS: To assess the rates of EOE in adult cases presenting with an FBO via prospective biopsy collection during index endoscopy.

METHODS: Oesophageal FBO cases requiring gastroscopy between February 2014 and January 2021 at a single institution with a unified policy to perform biopsies on FBO cases were analysed using medical records, endoscopy and histology. Statistical analysis was undertaken to compare those with and without EOE as their final diagnosis, including the timing of oesophageal biopsy and the season that cases presented.

RESULTS: One hundred ninety FBO presentations were analysed, 15 patients presented twice and one patient presented four times within the 7-year study period. Men represented 72% of cases. A total of 78% of cases had biopsies collected at an index or scheduled follow-up endoscopy. EOE was the cause of the FBO in 28% (53/190) of presentations. FBO secondary to EOE was more likely to occur in the spring and summer months (Australian September to March), with 39% (19 of 49) of cases presenting in spring attributable to EOE.

CONCLUSION: EOE affects a significant proportion of patients presenting with FBO (28%); a high biopsy rate of 78% in FBO cases provides an opportunity for prompt diagnosis and treatment.

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