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Ovarian hydatid cyst: an uncommon site of presentation.

Hydatid cyst is a parasitic infestation caused by Echinococcus larvae. Hydatid cyst of the ovary is a highly unusual presentation. Herein, we present a case of a young woman who complained of episodic lower abdominal pain. Ultrasound of the abdomen revealed a multi-cystic left adnexal mass measuring 86 mm x 67 mm. A possibility of ovarian cystic neoplasm was suggested. Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. On histopathological examination, a cyst measuring 8.0 x 5.5 x 4.5 cm was found, replacing the entire ovary. The cyst cavity was filled with serous fluid and multiple pearly white membranous structures, giving a multiloculated appearance. Microscopic examination showed a cyst lined by a lamellar membrane containing protoscolices and hooklets. Hydatid disease is a zoonotic ailment caused by tapeworms (Echinococcus granulosus or, less commonly, Echinococcus multilocularis) . The definitive hosts are carnivores. Humans are the accidental intermediate hosts. The hydatid cyst commonly affects the liver and the lungs. The primary hydatid cyst of the ovary is quite rare, with few case reports in the literature. In most cases, symptoms are vague, and the lesion is misdiagnosed as benign or malignant ovarian cystic neoplasm on clinical and radiological examination. Ovarian hydatid cyst is treated by surgery with ovarian cystectomy as the gold standard. The possibility of a hydatid cyst should be kept under differential diagnoses while evaluating the cystic diseases of the ovary.

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