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Role of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor in the pathogenesis of chronic asthma.

Immunology Letters 2023 December 23
BACKGROUND AND AIM: G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is an estrogen receptor located on the plasma membrane. We previously reported that the administration of G-1, a GPER-specific agonist, suppressed development of acute ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in a mouse model. Herein, we evaluate the involvement of GPER in a mouse model of chronic OVA asthma.

METHODS: G-1 or saline was administered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice with chronic OVA asthma, and pathological and immunological evaluation was performed. In addition, Foxp3-expressing CD4-positive T-cells in the spleen and ILC2 in the lungs were measured using flow cytometry.

RESULTS: We observed a significant decrease in the number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the G-1 treated group. In the airways, inflammatory cell accumulation, Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eotaxin) and epithelial cytokine TSLP were suppressed, while in the BALF, anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) were increased. Furthermore, in splenic mononuclear cells, Foxp3-expressing CD4-positive T-cells were increased in the G-1 group, whereas treatment with G-1 did not change the percentage of ILC2 in the lungs.

CONCLUSION: G-1 administration suppressed allergic airway inflammation in mice with chronic OVA asthma. GPER may be a potential therapeutic target for chronic allergic asthma.

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