Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Social Support, eHealth Literacy, and mHealth Use in Older Adults With Diabetes: Moderated Mediating Effect of the Perceived Importance of App Design.

Mobile healthcare has emerged as a prominent technological solution for self-management of health. However, the development and utilization of tailored mobile healthcare applications for older adults with diabetes mellitus remain limited. This study examined the relationship between social support and mobile healthcare use and further explored how this relationship varies with eHealth literacy and application design among older adults with diabetes mellitus. A descriptive cross-sectional trial was conducted with a structured self-report questionnaire, surveying 252 South Korean older adults with diabetes mellitus via offline and online modes. The mediating effect and moderated mediating effect were analyzed with the PROCESS macro of SPSS. eHealth literacy mediated the relationship between social support and mobile healthcare use. High levels of eHealth literacy and social support may increase mobile healthcare use among older adults with diabetes. Application design aesthetics facilitated mobile healthcare use. Future researchers, healthcare providers, and developers can contribute to the development of tailored mobile healthcare applications for older adults with diabetes mellitus by considering application design aspects such as font size, color, and menu configuration.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

Managing Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome.Annals of Emergency Medicine 2024 March 26

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app