Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Thymic innervation impairment in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

Neuroimmunomodulation 2023 December 22
The thymus is the primary lymphoid organ responsible for normal T-cell development. Yet, in abnormal metabolic conditions as well as an acute infection, the organ exhibits morphological and cellular alterations. It is well established that the immune system is in a tidy connection and dependent on the central nervous system (CNS), which regulates thymic function by means of innervation and neurotransmitters. Sympathetic innervation leaves the CNS and spreads through thymic tissue, where nerve endings interact directly or indirectly with thymic cells contributing to their maintenance and development. Herein, we hypothesized that brain damage due to an inflammatory process might elicit alterations upon the thymic-CNS neuroimmune axis, altering not just the sympathetic innervation and neurotransmitter release, but also modifying the thymus microenvironment and T cell development. We used the well-established multiple sclerosis model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), to study putative changes in the thymic neural, lymphoid, and microenvironmental compartments. We showed that along with EAE clinical development, thymus morphology, and cellular compartments are affected, altering the peripheric T cell population and modifying the retrograde thymic communication towards the CNS. Altogether, our data suggest that the thymic-CNS neuroimmune bidirectional axis is compromised in EAE. This imbalance may contribute to an increased and uncontrolled auto-immune reaction.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app