Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Grill-Related Burn Injuries: A Matched Cohort Study.

Barbequing can result in devastating burn injuries with unsafe practices. This study aims to characterize the demographics, injury characteristics, and outcomes of grill-related burns and identify ways of burn prevention. A retrospective review of patients admitted to a single-institution, metropolitan burn center from 1/1/17 - 7/1/23. Data included demographics, burn injury characteristics, and outcomes. Each Grill Cohort patient was matched to three non-grill controls by mBaux score and burn location. Out of 2,355 patients, 69 (2.9%) met Grill Cohort inclusion criteria. The Grill Cohort had 55 (79.7%) males and an average age of 41.7 ±17.5 years old. In the Grill Cohort, 25 (36.2%) patients had positive blood alcohol, 8 (11.6%) tested positive for amphetamines and 5 (7.2%) for cocaine at the time of admission. A total of 61 (88.4%) Grill Cohort burns involved the upper extremity, 43 (62.3%) the head/neck, 34 (49.3%) the lower extremity, and 30 (43.5%) the trunk. Compared to the Control Cohort, the Grill Cohort had smaller proportions of patients who were undomiciled (p<0.01) or had a history of mental illness (p<0.001). Grill-related burns had a greater proportion of flash/flame burns (p<0.001). This study suggests that middle-aged, domiciled males without psychiatric comorbidities are more likely to make preventable grilling errors resulting in burn injuries. Prevention strategies targeting this demographic should underscore the risks of grilling while intoxicated, proper handling of propane tanks and lighter fluid, and the use of flash/flame-resistant gear protecting the upper extremities and head/neck.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app