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Systematic Review
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Epidemiological, clinical and oncological outcomes of laryngeal verrucous carcinomas: a systematic review.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate epidemiological, clinical and oncological outcomes of patients with laryngeal verrucous carcinomas (LVC).

METHODS: Two independent authors investigated PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane Library for studies dedicated to epidemiological, clinical and oncological outcomes of patients with LVC. The following outcomes were investigated with PRISMA criteria: age; gender; tobacco/alcohol consumption; HPV infection; anatomical, pathological, therapeutic and survival outcomes. Studies were analyzed for bias through a validated clinical tool.

RESULTS: Of the 212 identified articles, 15 retrospective studies and one prospective uncontrolled study met our inclusion criteria. Three studies reported findings from national databases. The males/females ratio is 9/1. Mean age was 60.3 years, which was younger compared to other laryngeal malignancies. The alcohol, cigarette overuse and the HPV status of patients were lacking in most studies. Glottis and supraglottis were the most common anatomical locations, corresponding to 78.7% and 12.4% of cases, respectively. The main therapeutic approaches consisted of surgery, radiotherapy, surgery followed by radiotherapy. Treatments reported 5-year overall survival and disease-specific survival of 86.3 and 90.8, respectively. The 5- and 10-year local control rate were 83.6 and 72.6, respectively. The 10-year disease-specific survival was 80.2. Heterogeneity between studies was found for inclusion criteria, comorbidity data, and treatments.

CONCLUSION: LVC is a rare laryngeal cancer associated with better survival and recurrence outcomes than laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The role of radiotherapy in the treatment regimen needs to be investigated in future prospective controlled studies.

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