Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Multidisciplinary Initiative to Increase Guideline-concordant Antibiotic Prescription at Discharge for Hospitalized Children with Uncomplicated Community-acquired Pneumonia.

BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines recommend using narrow-spectrum antibiotics to treat uncomplicated pneumonia in children. This quality improvement (QI) project aimed to evaluate if QI methods could improve guideline-concordant antibiotic prescribing at hospital discharge for children with uncomplicated pneumonia.

METHODS: For this single-center QI project, we implemented QI interventions in serial plan-do-study-act cycles, focusing on the key drivers targeting general pediatric inpatient resident teams. Interventions included: (1)Small bimonthly group didactic sessions, (2)Visual job aids posted in resident work areas, and (3) A noon conference session. Balancing measures included postdischarge emergency room visits, readmission and adverse drug reactions.

RESULTS: To establish a baseline rate, we conducted a chart review of 112 children diagnosed with uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia during hospitalization from July 2017 through January 2019. The average monthly percentage of children discharged with guideline-concordant antibiotics was 67%. The intervention period was from February 2019 through February 2020, with 118 children meeting the criteria after a review of 262 charts. After our interventions, the average monthly percentage of children discharged with guideline-concordant antibiotics increased to 87%, with the increase persisting for at least 12 months. There were no significant differences in balancing measures pre- and post-interventions.

CONCLUSIONS: Our QI initiative sustained increased rates of uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia guideline-concordant antibiotic prescribing at discharge over 12 months without an increase in balancing measures. The enduring changes in prescribing behavior suggest a lasting impact of our interventions.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app