JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Utilizing non-human primate models to combat recent COVID-19/SARS-CoV-2 and viral infectious disease outbreaks.

In recent times, global viral outbreaks and diseases, such as COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), Zika (ZIKV), monkeypox (MPOX), Ebola (EBOV), and Marburg (MARV), have been extensively documented. Swiftly deciphering the mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis and devising vaccines or therapeutic interventions to curtail these outbreaks stand as paramount imperatives. Amidst these endeavors, animal models emerge as pivotal tools. Among these models, non-human primates (NHPs) hold a position of particular importance. Their proximity in evolutionary lineage and physiological resemblances to humans render them a primary model for comprehending human viral infections. This review encapsulates the pivotal role of various NHP species-such as rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), african green monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus/aethiops), pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina/Macaca leonina), baboons (Papio hamadryas/Papio anubis), and common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)-in investigations pertaining to the abovementioned viral outbreaks. These NHP models play a pivotal role in illuminating key aspects of disease dynamics, facilitating the development of effective countermeasures, and contributing significantly to our overall understanding of viral pathogenesis.

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