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96th-hour impact of scalding burns on end organ damage, systemic oxidative stress, and wound healing in rats treated with three different types of dressings.

In this study, we investigated the effects of three different burn dressing treatments, including experimental, silver, and modern dressing materials, on systemic oxidative stress in rats with severe scald burns within the first 96 h. The rats were divided into five groups: a burn group (n = 10), a polylactic membrane (PLM) group (n = 10), a silver sulfadiazine (SSD) group (n = 10), a curcumin group (n = 10), and a control group (n = 10), consisting of equal numbers of female and male rats. In the first four groups, 30% of the rats' total body surface area was scalded at 95°C. The burn group was not treated. Each group was treated with group-name dressing material. The control group was neither treated nor burned. The rats were sacrificed, and blood and tissue samples were obtained at the 96th hour when severe effects of oxidative stress developed postburns. Systemic inflammatory biomarkers and oxidative stress parameters were examined. In addition, apoptosis and organ damage in liver, kidney, lung, and skin tissues were evaluated biochemically and histopathologically. When the parameters were statistically analyzed, we found that systemic levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory damage to liver, kidney, and lung tissues were lower in the three treated groups than in the burn group. We believe that the dressing material's efficacy in the treatment of severe burns may be dependent on its ability to combat oxidative stress and inflammation.

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