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Analysis of postural stability using foam posturography in patients with persistent postural-perceptual dizziness.

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is worsened in a standing posture, or by body movement, or visual stimulation. We aimed to evaluate postural stability in PPPD patients using foam posturography and to investigate the dependence on visual and somatosensory input in the standing posture.

METHODS: Foam posturography was performed on 53 PPPD patients, and data from the PPPD patients were compared with the data from an age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The PPPD patients were divided into four groups based on the findings of vestibular function tests and the effect of vestibular function on posturographic data was examined.

RESULTS: Romberg's ratios were significantly higher in PPPD patients than in controls. The median Romberg's ratios in PPPD patients with normal vestibular function were also higher than those in controls. However, foam ratio was significantly lower in PPPD patients than in controls. The median foam ratios in PPPD patients with vestibular dysfunction were also lower than those in controls.

CONCLUSIONS: In a standing posture, PPPD patients may be more dependent on visual input and less dependent on somatosensory input than healthy subjects. Higher dependence on visual and lower dependence on somatosensory input in PPPD may be a feature unaffected by vestibular function.

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