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Feasibility and safety of left bundle branch area pacing in cardiac amyloidosis. A single center experience.

BACKGROUND: Conventional right ventricle (RV) pacemaker stimulation has been associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with cardiac amyloidosis (CA). Left bundle branch area pacing (LABPP) has been suggested as a promising alternative. We sought to assess the safety, feasibility, and outcomes of LABPP in patients with CA.

METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed echocardiography and pacing parameters and clinical outcomes in 23 consecutive patients with CA and LBBAP implanted from June 2020 to October 2022.

RESULTS: LBBAP was successfully performed in 22 over 23 patients (19 male, 78.6 ± 11.7 years, 20 ATTR, mean LVEF 45.5 ± 16.2%). After the procedure, 9 patients showed Qr pattern and 11 a qR pattern in V1 on ECG. Average procedure time was 67 ± 28 min. After 7.7 ± 5.2 months follow-up, no procedure-related complications had occurred. Although, a significant reduction in QRS width (p = .001) was achieved, we did not observe significant changes in LVEF and Nt ProBNP at 6 months of follow-up. Pacing parameters were stable during follow-up: LBB capture threshold and R wave amplitude were 1.0 ±  0.5 V and 10.6 ± 6.0 mV versus 0.8 ±  0.1 V, p = .21 and 10.6 ± 5.1 mV (p = .985) at follow up.

CONCLUSION: LBBAP is safe and feasible pacing technique for patients with CA. LBBAP is associated with significant narrowing of QRSd without worsening in LVEF and Nt-proBNP.

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