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Similarity and difference in large-scale functional network alternations between behavioral addictions and substance use disorder: a comparative meta-analysis.

Psychological Medicine 2023 December 5
Behavioral addiction (BA) and substance use disorder (SUD) share similarities and differences in clinical symptoms, cognitive functions, and behavioral attributes. However, little is known about whether and how functional networks in the human brain manifest commonalities and differences between BA and SUD. Voxel-wise meta-analyses of resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) were conducted in BA and SUD separately, followed by quantitative conjunction analyses to identify the common and distinct alterations across both the BA and SUD groups. A total of 92 datasets with 2444 addicted patients and 2712 healthy controls (HCs) were eligible for the meta-analysis. Our findings demonstrated that BA and SUD exhibited common alterations in rs-FC between frontoparietal network (FPN) and other high-level neurocognitive networks (i.e. default mode network (DMN), affective network (AN), and salience network (SN)) as well as hyperconnectivity between SN seeds and the Rolandic operculum in SSN. In addition, compared with BA, SUD exhibited several distinct within- and between-network rs-FC alterations mainly involved in the DMN and FPN. Further, altered within- and between-network rs-FC showed significant association with clinical characteristics such as the severity of addiction in BA and duration of substance usage in SUD. The common rs-FC alterations in BA and SUD exhibited the relationship with consistent aberrant behaviors in both addiction groups, such as impaired inhibition control and salience attribution. By contrast, the distinct rs-FC alterations might suggest specific substance effects on the brain neural transmitter systems in SUD.

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