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Cross-cultural adaptation and construct validity of the Chinese Version of Visual Vertigo Analogue Scale by using structural equation modeling.

BACKGROUND: Visual vertigo (VV) is a disease characterized by various visual signal-induced discomforts, including dizziness, unsteady balance, activity avoiding, and so forth. Distinguishing it from other kinds of dizziness is important because it needs the combination of visual training and vestibular rehabilitation together. However, there is no appropriate tool to diagnose VV in China, thus we would like to introduce an effective tool to China.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to establish the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of visual vertigo analogue scale (VVAS-CH) and to achieve its crosscultural adaptation in order to promote its further usage in China.

METHODS: A total of 1681 patients complaining of vertigo or dizziness were enrolled and they were asked to complete the VVAS-CH. The cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and construct validity of the VVAS-CH were determined.

RESULTS: Split-half reliability was 0.939, showing a good reliability. Factor analysis identified only one common factor for the nine items that explained 64.83% of the total variance. Most fit indices reached acceptable levels, proving the good fit of the VVAS-CH model.

CONCLUSIONS: The VVAS-CH validated in this study can be used as an effective tool for diagnosing and evaluating VV in patients whose native language is Chinese.

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