Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The effect of patient's body weight, infusion connection point, and infusion pump position on intravenous multi-infusion drug delivery at low infusion rates suitable for premature neonates.

INTRODUCTION: Parenteral drug administration in the neonatal intensive care involves complex pharmacotherapy adjusted for the patient's weight, fluid allowance, and complex multi-infusion systems.

OBJECTIVES: We investigated the delivery rate of a model drug through a multi-infusion system consisting of six intravenous infusions.

METHODS: Delivery rate of the model drug was determined after infusion initiation and termination. Measurements were collected spectrophotometrically in real time. Time to drug delivery and the amount of drug delivered were measured.

KEY FINDINGS: The longest time to drug delivery was observed for a 500 g neonate model with a distal infusion connection point and neutral pump position (337 ± 30 min, P < 0.001). The shortest time was observed for a 1000 g neonate model in the combination of proximal infusion connection point and neutral pump position (18 ± 12 min, P < 0.05). The expected 100% of the drug was delivered only in two combinations: 500 g and 1000 g neonate models, proximal infusion connection point and neutral pump position (100.4 ± 4.7%, P = 0.819 and 100.2 ± 2.7%, P = 0.874, respectively). While the least drug was delivered to a 500 g neonate model in the combination of distal infusion connection point and neutral pump position (27.5 ± 5.8%, P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Delayed drug delivery to premature neonates due to multi-infusion systems may compromise accurate drug administration and lead to dosing errors.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app