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Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in Western Brazilian Amazon: Associated factors and neonatal outcomes.

OBJECTIVE: Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are responsible for several maternal and fetal complications. This study investigated the occurrence of HDP, associated factors, and neonatal complications in women living in the Western Brazilian Amazon.

METHODS: This is a population-based cross-sectional study with 1521 mother-child pairs enrolled in the Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition in Acre birth cohort (MINA-Brazil study). All parturients with HDP (registered in the medical records) were identified. Crude and adjusted prevalence ratios were calculated in Poisson regression models with robust variance.

RESULTS: The prevalence of HDP was 11.0% (95% CI: 9.5-12.7). Factors associated with the prevalence of HDP were maternal age ≥ 35 years (PR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3-3.0), primigravida status (PR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.5-2.7), pre-pregnancy obesity (PR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.9-4.0), higher gestational weight gain (highest quartile RP: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.6-3.8), chronic hypertension (RP: 3.6; 95% CI: 2.7-4.9), and diabetes in pregnancy (RP: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1-3.2). HDP was associated with risk for caesarean delivery (PR: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.6-2.0) and prematurity (PR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3-3.2). Gestational malaria was not associated with HDP in Amazonian pregnant women.

CONCLUSIONS: Evaluating risk factors before pregnancy and during the prenatal period is essential for reducing adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes.

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