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Evaluation of antibody drug delivery efficiency via nebulizer in various airway models and breathing patterns.

BACKGROUND: Nebulizers are commonly used to treat respiratory diseases, which are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. While inhalation therapy with antibodies has been evaluated in preclinical studies and clinical trials for respiratory diseases, it has not yet been approved for treatment. Moreover, there is limited information regarding the delivery efficiency of therapeutic antibodies via nebulizer.

METHODS: In this study, the nebulization characteristics and drug delivery efficiencies were compared when immunoglobulin G (IgG) was delivered by five nebulizers using two airway models and five breathing patterns. The study confirmed that the delivered dose and drug delivery efficiency were reduced in the child model compared to those in the adult model and in the asthma pattern compared to those in the normal breathing pattern.

RESULTS: The NE-SM1 NEPLUS vibrating mesh nebulizer demonstrated the highest delivery efficiency when calculated as a percentage of the loading dose, whereas the PARI BOY SX + LC SPRINT (breath-enhanced) jet nebulizer had the highest delivery efficiency when calculated as a percentage of the emitted dose.

CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the total inspiration volume, output rate, and particle size should be considered when IgG nebulization is used. We, therefore, propose a method for evaluating the efficiency of nebulizer for predicting antibody drug delivery.

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