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Role of SYVN1 in the control of airway remodeling in asthma protection by promoting SIRT2 ubiquitination and degradation.

Biological Research 2023 December 3
BACKGROUND: Asthma is a heterogenous disease that characterized by airway remodeling. SYVN1 (Synoviolin 1) acts as an E3 ligase to mediate the suppression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through ubiquitination and degradation. However, the role of SYVN1 in the pathogenesis of asthma is unclear.

RESULTS: In the present study, an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model was used to evaluate the effect of SYVN1 on asthma. An increase in SYVN1 expression was observed in the lungs of mice after OVA induction. Overexpression of SYVN1 attenuated airway inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition induced by OVA. The increased ER stress-related proteins and altered epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were also inhibited by SYVN1 in vivo. Next, TGF-β1-induced bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were used to induce EMT process in vitro. Results showed that TGF-β1 stimulation downregulated the expression of SYVN1, and SYVN1 overexpression prevented ER stress response and EMT process in TGF-β1-induced cells. In addition, we identified that SYVN1 bound to SIRT2 and promoted its ubiquitination and degradation. SIRT2 overexpression abrogated the protection of SYVN1 on ER stress and EMT in vitro.

CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that SYVN1 suppresses ER stress through the ubiquitination and degradation of SIRT2 to block EMT process, thereby protecting against airway remodeling in asthma.

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