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The relationship between anthropometric indices and the presence of hypertension in an Iranian population sample using data mining algorithms.

Hypertension (HTN) is a common chronic condition associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Anthropometric indices of adiposity are known to be associated with a risk of HTN. The aim of this study was to identify the anthropometric indices that best associate with HTN in an Iranian population. 9704 individuals aged 35-65 years were recruited as part of the Mashhad Stroke and Heart Atherosclerotic Disorder (MASHAD) study. Demographic and anthropometric data of all participants were recorded. HTN was defined as a systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mmHg, and/ or a diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mmHg on two subsequent measurements, or being treated with oral drug therapy for BP. Data mining methods including Logistic Regression (LR), Decision Tree (DT), and Bootstrap Forest (BF) were applied. Of 9704 participants, 3070 had HTN, and 6634 were normotensive. LR showed that body roundness index (BRI), body mass index (BMI) and visceral adiposity index (VAI) were significantly associated with HTN in both genders (P < 0.0001). BRI showed the greatest association with HTN (OR = 1.276, 95%CI = (1.224, 1.330)). For BMI we had OR = 1.063, 95%CI = (1.047, 1.080), for VAI we had OR = 1.029, 95%CI = (1.020, 1.038). An age < 47 years and BRI < 4.04 was associated with a 90% probability of being normotensive. The BF indicated that age, sex and BRI had the most important role in HTN. In summary, among anthropometric indices the most powerful indicator for discriminating hypertensive from normotensive patients was BRI.

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