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Adoption of new transportation assistive technologies by people with mild intellectual disabilities.

PURPOSE: Although numerous technology-based assistive devices are available for use by people with intellectual disabilities, device adoption rates of are often low. The current research examined reasons for non-adoption among two samples of people with mild intellectual disabilities focusing on transportation: an area of great concern for individuals with intellectual disabilities. The influences on adoption or non-adoption of the perceived benefits of assistive devices were assessed together with the effects of device complexity, transportation self-efficacy, desire for self-determination regarding transport, technophobia, and the desire to be seen to "fit in" with wider society when wearing a device.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 44 people attending a support venue in southwest London. Outcomes to the interviews were employed in the formation of a questionnaire distributed to a wider national sample of people with mild intellectual disabilities. Interview and survey questions were created using Tourangeau's investigation method. Responses to the survey were subjected to a logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Technophobia, transportation self-efficacy and desires for self-determination and to "fit-in" exerted powerful impacts on device adoption. Campaigns and activities designed to increase adoption rates need to recognise these important influences.

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