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Value of q waves in lateral and left precordial leads in patients with left bundle branch block to predict the response to cardiac resynchronization therapy.

BACKGROUND: The cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) non-response rate can reach 30% in heart failure (HF) patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). This study aimed to evaluate the value of baseline q waves in leads I, V5, or V6 in predicting response to CRT in patients with HF and LBBB.

METHODS: Patients with HF (left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%) and LBBB receiving CRT implantation were retrospectively enrolled. Baseline characteristics and electrocardiogram parameters, including lateral and left precordial q waves were evaluated. Non-response to CRT was defined as the improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 5% at a 6-month follow-up.

RESULTS: A total of 132 patients (mean age 63.0 ± 10.4 years, 94 [71.2%] male) were included. Among them, 32 patients with q waves in leads I, V5, or V6 were classified into the qLBBB (+) group, and the rest without q waves in these leads were defined as the qLBBB (-) group. The CRT non-response rate in the qLBBB (+) group was markedly higher than that in the qLBBB (-) group (68.8% vs. 33.3%, p < .001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of baseline q waves in leads I, V5, or V6 remained significantly associated with a higher rate of CRT non-response in patients with HF and LBBB (odds ratio: 4.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.5-15.0, p = .007).

CONCLUSION: Any q wave in leads I, V5, or V6 was an independent predictive factor for CRT non-response in patients with HF and LBBB.

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