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Performance of the Aspergillus galactomannan lateral flow assay with a digital reader for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis: a multicenter study.

PURPOSE: The objective of this multicenter study was to compare the diagnostic performance of lateral flow assay (LFA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the Dynamiker Aspergillus Galactomannan levels in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples for I.

METHODS: We registered 310 clinically suspected Aspergillus infection patients from December 2021 to February 2023 and classified them into subgroups as the "IA group" and "non-IA group" based on the latest EORTC/MSG guidelines. The immunoassays were analyzed by LFA and ELISA respectively.

RESULTS: Galactomannan was examined using LFA, and serum and BALF samples demonstrated sensitivities of 82.57% and 89.47%, specificities of 90.76% and 92.00%, PPVs of 89.11% and 96.23%, and NPVs of 85.04% and 79.31%, respectively. Galactomannan was observed using two assays in serum and BALF samples and showed PPAs of 95.11% and 93.33%, NPAs of 89.19% and 96.30%, and TPAs of 92.47% and 94.25%, respectively. The ROC curve demonstrated that LFA had optimum diagnostic value when the index value (I value) = 0.5, the sensitivity was 84.94%, and the specificity was 90.97%.

CONCLUSION: Compared to the ELISA method, the LFA has shown excellent performance for the diagnosis of IA in serum and BALF sample and can be used as an assay for the early diagnosis of patients with IA. The dynamic change in galactomannan levels may be useful for assessing treatment response.

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