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The Clinical Influence of Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index in Patients With Gastric Cancer Who Receive Curative Treatment.

Anticancer Research 2023 December
BACKGROUND/AIM: We evaluated the clinical impact of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) in patients who received curative treatment and perioperative adjuvant treatment. We also investigated the association between the GNRI and the clinicopathological features of patients with GC.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study included 280 patients who underwent curative treatment for GC between 2005 and 2020. The prognosis and clinicopathological parameters of the high-GNRI and low-GNRI groups were compared.

RESULTS: In the GNRI-high group, the overall survival (OS) rates at 3 and 5 years after surgery were significantly lower (82.7% and 77.9%, respectively) than those in the GNRI-low group (56.4% and 40.8%). The GNRI was selected for the final multivariate analysis model for OS. The GNRI was also a significant prognostic factor for recurrence-free survival (RFS). The RFS rates at 3 and 5 years after surgery were 79.1% and 74.8%, respectively, in the GNRI-high group, and 48.0% and 38.6% in the GNRI-low group. The GNRI was selected for the final multivariate analysis model for RFS. The GNRI was also found to affect the postoperative clinical course, including postoperative surgical complications and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy.

CONCLUSION: The GNRI may be a promising prognostic and predictive factor for gastric cancer. In the future, the GNRI may be used to select optimal treatment strategies.

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